A summary of machiavellis views

Yet when a more offensive stance was demanded to defeat Hannibal, the Roman Republic was able to turn to the leadership of Scipio, whose personal qualities were more fitted to the times. Political-military alliances continually changed, featuring condottieri mercenary leaderswho changed sides without warning, and the rise and fall of many short-lived governments.

The diversity characteristic of civic regimes, which was so reviled by Machiavelli's predecessors, proves to be an abiding advantage of republics over principalities. The Socratic school of classical political philosophy, especially Aristotlehad become a major influence upon European political thinking in the late Middle Ages.

The Prince is concerned with autocratic regimes, not with republican regimes.

Niccolò Machiavelli

Not only are the people competent to discern the best course of action when orators lay out competing plans, but they are in fact better qualified to make decisions, in Machiavelli's view, than are princes. During this time, Machiavelli thrived under the patronage of the Florentine gonfaloniere or chief administrator for lifePiero Soderini.

Unlike The Prince, the Discourses was authored over a long period of time commencing perhaps in or and completed in oralthough again only published posthumously in In a sense, it was thought that rulers did well when they did good; they earned the right to be obeyed and respected inasmuch as they showed themselves to be virtuous and morally upright.

MACHIAVELLI'S VIEW OF HUMAN NATURE

Analyzing Power It has been a common view among political philosophers that there exists a special relationship between moral goodness and legitimate authority.

In his opinion, Christianity, along with the teleological Aristotelianism that the church had come to accept, allowed practical decisions to be guided too much by imaginary ideals and encouraged people to lazily leave events up to providence or, as he would put it, chance, luck or fortune.

Likewise, cases have been made for Machiavelli's political morality, his conception of the state, his religious views, and many other features of his work as the distinctive basis for the originality of his contribution. The First Century, Oxford: For example, quite early in the Discourses, in Book I, chapter 4a chapter title announces that the disunion of the plebs and senate in Rome "kept Rome free.

I am no longer afraid of poverty or frightened of death. Xenophon, Plato and Aristotle. Firstly, particularly in the Discourses on Livy, Machiavelli is unusual in the positive side he sometimes seems to describe in factionalism in republics.

The bond of love is one which men, wretched creatures they are, break when it is to their advantage to do so; but fear is strengthened by a dread of punishment which is always effective.

The Mirror of Princes genre. He makes the generalization that men are, " But how are we to square this with his statements in The Prince. This was a classically influenced genre, with models at least as far back as Xenophon and Isocrates.

And of course, power alone cannot obligate one, inasmuch as obligation assumes that one cannot meaningfully do otherwise. Rather, salient features of the distinctively Machiavellian approach to politics should be credited to an incongruity between historical circumstance and intellectual possibility.

With their teleological understanding of things, Socratics argued that desirable things tend to happen by nature, as if nature desired them, but Machiavelli claimed that such things happen by blind chance or human action.

With their teleological understanding of things, Socratics argued that desirable things tend to happen by nature, as if nature desired them, but Machiavelli claimed that such things happen by blind chance or human action.

He laid aside the Medieval conception "of the state as a necessary creation for humankinds spiritual, material, and social well-being. The effect of the Machiavellian dichotomy between the need for flexibility and the inescapable constancy of character is to demonstrate an inherent practical limitation in single-ruler regimes.

His advice to princes was therefore certainly not limited to discussing how to maintain a state.

MACHIAVELLI'S VIEW OF HUMAN NATURE

Machiavelli argued against seeing mere peace and economic growth as worthy aims on their own, if they would lead to what Mansfield calls the "taming of the prince. Despite having been subjected to torture " with the rope " in which the prisoner is hanged from his bound wrists, from the back, forcing the arms to bear the body's weight and dislocating the shouldershe denied involvement and was released after three weeks.

A few dissenting voices, most notably Sebastian de Grazia and Maurizio Virolihave attempted to rescue Machiavelli's reputation from those who view him as hostile or indifferent to Christianity. The discussion of fortification emphasizes this conception of the city: See how Italy beseeches God to send someone to save her from those barbarous cruelties and outrages; see how eager and willing the country is to follow a banner, if someone will raise it.

University of Notre Dame Press. And Machiavelli viewed misery as one of the vices that enables a prince to rule.

What makes Machiavelli a troubling yet stimulating thinker is that, in his attempt to draw different conclusions from the commonplace expectations of his audience, he still incorporated important features of precisely the conventions he was challenging.

The experience would, like Machiavelli's time in foreign courts and with the Borgia, heavily influence his political writings. Sep 19,  · This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Apr 03,  · Machiavelli's political views are, however, far too complex to be summed up in a few quick sentences.

You are much better served by reading The Prince and the Discourses on Livy and forming your own opinion. Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (/ ˌ m æ k i ə ˈ v ɛ l i /, Italian: [nikkoˈlɔ mmakjaˈvɛlli]; 3 May – 21 June ) was an Italian diplomat, politician, historian, philosopher, humanist, writer, playwright and poet of the Renaissance period.

He has often been called the father of modern political science. For many years he was a senior official in the Florentine Republic. A summary of Chapters X–XI in Niccolò Machiavelli's The Prince.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Prince and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. First, it is important to establish that "liberality" for Machiavelli means willingness to spend lavishly, not any political ideology in the way the term is used today.

It is tempting to dismiss The Prince as an inauthentic expression of Machiavelli's “real” views and preferences, Mark Hulliung's suggestion that “both” Machiavellis need to be lent equal weight thus enjoys a certain plausibility (Hulliung ).

9. Machiavelli's Place in Western Thought.

A summary of machiavellis views
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SparkNotes: The Prince: Overview